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Lest We Forget: R. B. Greaves

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Rating 60% (3 Votes)

What do The Buccaneers, the New Riders of the Purple Sage, Mojo Nixon, Stevie Wonder, and Tom Jones have in common?  They all recorded “Take A Letter, Maria,” a song written and made famous by Robert Bertram Aloysius Greaves III, who recorded under the name R. B. Greaves.  You know the song.  It’s a classic, one of those wonderful story-songs that makes you want to shout advice to the characters: “Don’t do it, Maria!  He’s on the rebound!”

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Dan Fogelberg And The Little Store on North Prospect And East Frye

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Rating 83% (7 Votes)

I got to thinking about Dan Fogelberg the other day.   The first of his records I bought is still my favourite:  1979’s Phoenix.  You’d know it for its hits (“Longer” and “Heart Hotels”), and you might also remember the cracking good song that ended side 1, “Face the Fire.”  That song, a response to the Three Mile Island nuclear disaster, came to be considered the “unofficial anthem” of the No Nukes movement, and it’s still a powerful, emotive song.

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A Talking Head Debates the Nuclear Future

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Rating 93% (8 Votes)

More than 25 years ago (Oct. 27, 1986) Time Magazine dubbed David Byrne “Rock's Renaissance Man.” At the time it seemed premature; after-all, The Talking Heads had only emerged nine years before from the mire of punk bands who could barely play their instruments and Talking Heads 77 was as stripped down as it gets. The music got better and more complex, peaking (in my opinion) with 1980's Remain In Light and its Afro poly-rhythms. 

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Named For An Alien, Covered By 50

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Rating 82% (9 Votes)

The brilliant Canadian progressive/melodic pop trio Klaatu just didn’t get no respect.  Well, from discerning listeners, perhaps they did, and they had a number of hits in the seventies and eighties, but I think they are just another example of a band that never found the massive audience they deserved.  However, they found what might seem like an unlikely group of admirers ten years ago: Fifty Cent’s G-Unit.

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