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Some Great Reasons to Listen to Ry Cooder's Bop Till You Drop

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Rating 74% (11 Votes)

The first Ry Cooder cassette (that’s right, cassette) I ever owned was Bop Till You Drop and I didn’t care for it for a long time.  A cassette back then meant mobility. You put it in a Walkman and you could move around the world with music.  That was big and Sony was king. To walk along a beach with music in your ears was revolutionary at the time.  Now we sit in our own worlds of music all the time.  It’s no big thing anymore.

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Black Sabbath’s First Last Album

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Rating 70% (6 Votes)

I long ago lost interest in the debate (and that was always the wrong word for it anyway) about who created heavy metal.  It was Black Sabbath with their song “Black Sabbath” and their album Black Sabbath.  There isn’t a proper heavy-metal band in the last forty years that hasn’t owed a debt to Sabbath, and about 75% of the time, that debt is clearly audible.  Sure, Deep Purple and Uriah Heep and Blue Cheer and so forth all played real loud – but Black Sabbath created the sound that we have ever since immediately recognized as heavy metal.

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Mahavishnu Orchestra: The Flame Still Burns

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Rating 89% (8 Votes)

I have an original pressing of the Mahavishnu Orchestra’s second album, Birds of Fire, from 1973.  Above the name of the band and the title of the album on the cover is one word in bold caps: QUADRAPHONIC.  And in case anyone didn’t know what that meant (everyone did), at the bottom of the cover was this blurb: “The SQ™ disc may be played with excellent results through any conventional high fidelity system – stereo or four-channel.  Played on SQQUADRAPHONIC systems, it will provide the unique experience of four-channel listening at its best.”

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Tom Jones Then

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Rating 74% (5 Votes)

Tom Jones has consistently reinvented himself. His “country period” was particularly abysmal, but after his first manager died and Jones' son, Mark Woodward, replaced him, he began to flirt with contemporary music. Jones has always covered and interpreted other people's songs, but he had a late career breakthrough, primarily in Britain, when he recorded Prince's Kiss with the sychn-pop group Art Of Noise.

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